Maker Party at ‘Bibblerian’ library – towards a public office for making, learning and training

One of my favourite libraries in the Stockholm area is the recently launched ‘Bibblerian’, a small but dedicated place for reading, learning and making.

Step by step, and in partnership with the development project The Public Office , the library has a vision of becoming not only a place for checking out books, but also a free and open shared office space for project work, training and making.

Tomorrow I’m happy to be part of the library’s very first Maker Party, yay! :) As a matter of fact, it’s going to be also the very first Swedish library maker party. At the event, we will showcase a ‘smorgasbord’ of both physical and digital tools for making and interactivity, such as Scratch, fusible beads, knitting, Webmaker, App Maker, Leap Motion, Raspberry Pi, Arduino…. even the library’s own kitchen! :) Since it’s the first time this kind of event is hosted in the library we don’t really know how many will show up, or what kind of maker activites they will prefer. My guess is that the ‘kitchen make’ will be especially popular! :D

Will keep you posted here and on the event page!

/Åke

Remix IFLA at the Mozillarian Maker Party!

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The will be many cool web things you can make at the Mozillarian Maker Party on Wednesday. Why not remix IFLA:s website, for example? :) Or tell your #wlic2014 story in a comic strip with Thimble? You can start remixing your own comic strip right away in English here  or  in French here! (thanks @guldorac for sharing this great idea!)

Our hangout and hackerspace will be the shared office space Locaux Motiv in the Guillotière. Hope to see you there! Check out the invite here and pre-register here!

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Calling Connected Learners & Maker Librarians @ IFLA 2014!

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Good news for connected learners and maker librarians!
At the upcoming IFLA 2014 – World Library and Information Congress in Lyon, there will be at least three events dealing with Connected Learning:

1: The Public Library as a Community Hub for Connected Learning

In Session 167 – Management and Marketing with Public Libraries, I will give a presentation on The Public Library as a Community Hub for Connected Learning. Download the paper here!

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2: Mozillarian Maker Party!

In conjunction with my presentation Flore Allemandou and I invite you all to take part in a Maker Party at Locaux Motiv! Read more and RSVP here!

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3:  Shaping the New Information Normal: Connected Learning through Empowering Young Adult Spaces

Maura Marx, Deputy Director for Library Services at Institute of Library and Museum Services in Washington DC, will present on connected learning and adult spaces in session Session 203 – Metropolitan Libraries. Read more here and download her paper here!

/Åke

 

Throw a Maker Party in your library!

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The launch of Mozilla’s global Maker Party campaign is approaching…

 

The campaign will be running from the 15th of July until the 15th of September and you and your library can be a part of it. All kinds of people who care about the open web, learning, teaching and making will throw Maker Party events in different public and semi-public spaces where connected learning can happen: schools, universities, libraries, cafés, youth centres, cultural centres and more….

There are already quite a few library events registered on the Maker Party events page, check them out and add your own event!
You can also find them here on the blog, listed on our Mozilla events in libraries page.

 

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Libraries are perfect locations for learning, teaching the web and promoting web literacy in our communities.   A Maker Party doesn’t have to be big. As a matter of fact it can be as small as two people, and still be both meaningful, effective and fun. Think quality, not just quantity. Here in Stockholm, on the 6th of September, we’ll throw our first library Maker Party at the Bibblerian Library, a new centre for learning, community support and study and career counceling. It’s going to be great fun!

What’s your webmaking plan for YOUR library?

Any library can be a zone for digital learning and making. Why not follow these simple steps and throw a Maker Party in your own library:

 

 

Missed out at the Enter the Mozillarian webinar today? Watch the recorded version here!

Screenshot 2014-06-25 21.59.07The nCompass Live crew at the Nebraska Library Commission (Christa Burns and Michael Sauers) are really great online moderators! They did a great job at today’s show, when Christine, Chris and I talked about how to build bridges between libraries and Mozilla projects, networks and resources. Technically speaking, everything also went very well, apart from some minor issues with my own computer.

And… now the recorded version of the show is available, yay! :)

Please share your opinions and ideas about the show and don’t hesitate to take contact, on Twitter or by e-mail (mozillarian@gmail.com), for follow up questions!

/Åke

Join us for this webinar! Enter the Mozillarian: Weaving the Mozilla and Library Communities

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On June 25,  Åke, Christine and Chris have been kindly invited by the Nebraska Library Commission to be part of their monthly nCompass Live Tech Talk Webinar! The conversation will be moderated by the Technology Innovation Librarian Michael Sauers, aka Travelling Librarian, and we’re so grateful for the invitation!

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Want to join us for this webinar? Register here!

 

In this session we’ll highlight some Webmaker tools and resources, showcase some emerging Mozillarians, and give you some easy ways to get started by throwing a Webmaker Party.

MakerPartyLogoMore and more librarians and library-lovers are realizing that they have a lot in common with Mozilla. While some people think Mozilla is just a tech company that makes Firefox, these savvy “Mozillarians” know that they’re more than that: Mozilla is a global community of people who believe that openness, innovation, and opportunity are key to the continued health of the Internet

Mozilla creates initiatives like Webmaker and drives the Hive Learning Networks — both focused on advancing web literacy, connected learning, and digital skills. These programs  spark creativity and innovation, as well as build tools, curricula, and a community of people dedicated to helping others. Initiatives that enable citizens to develop 21st-century skills, become creators and shapers of the web, explore interests and opportunities, and develop themselves and their communities. Which kinda sounds like, well, what librarians do :)

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Speakers:

akeÅke Nygren, Stockholm Public Library
Åke has been active in various library projects with a focus on lifelong learning, learning environments, digital inclusion, and social media. He is currently working with digital signage and social media for the Stockholm Public Library Digital Library Dept. Åke is a big fan of Mozilla and other projects working for a free and open internet. In January 2014, he launched a collaborative blog — Mozillarian.org — where he and other “Mozillarians” explore the intersection between the Mozilla community and the library world.

chrisChris Lawrence, Mozilla Foundation
Chris is the Senior Director of Mozilla’s Webmaker community team. Through this work Chris helps guide the Hive Learning Network project — helping to spread connected learning and web literacy through the exploration of digital skills for youth and educators. He is a graduate of Bank Street College’s Museum Education program and previously worked at the New York Hall of Science.

christineChristine Prefontaine, Facilitating Change
Christine is a strategist, activist, innovator, and designer. She is the founder of Facilitating Change, a boutique consultancy focusing on international, nonprofit, and community development. Her recent work focuses on civic media and technologies, libraries and other innovation spaces, and web-first publishing. She is a huge library advocate and an active member of the Mozilla community. Previously, she worked for the Technology & Social Change Group (TASCHA) at the University of Washington Information School, Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and Deloitte’s Emerging Markets Group.

Reset the Net – Reset the Library!

 

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June the 5th was the anniversary of the Snowden leaks. A perfect day for the launch of ResetTheNet.org , a campaign and resource site put together by the nonprofit FightForTheFuture.org, in partnership with Mozilla, Google, Twitter, Dropbox and many other web companies and organisations.  The aim of the campaign is to make it easier for  all of us to boost online privacy and get protection from governmental mass surveillence:

We can’t stop targeted attacks, but we *can* stop mass surveillance, by building proven security into the everyday Internet.

On the website one can easily examine and download some powerful apps (for Windows, Mac, Linux, Android and iOS) that improve your online security considerably and make mass surveillance more difficult. A wonderful idea!

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One day after the launch of Reset the Net, as a way of spreading the news in the library world about their Privacy Pack, I remixed a teaching kit on the ever so fabulous Mozilla Webmaker.org and put together  a make targeting librarians who care about online privacy in their own library community: ResetThe Library.org.

Why? Well, because…

  1. In my opinion, libraries are all about exactly what the Reset the Net Campaign stands for: a borderless, open and free public resource (Internet) that protects individuals civil rights, freedom of speech and freedom from censorship, control and mass surveillence.
  2. We need to integrate the online integrity debate in libraries and make more people passionate about the idea of protecting this fabulous shared resource called Internet from mass surveillence.
  3. We need to be more explicit about what more and more people in, and outside the library world, feel is a good Internet ethos: facilitating knowledge and protecting both individual and the library community from governmental control that threatens the open and democratic society.
  4. We need tools and gateways that make it easier for librarians to embrace Internet as a global digital library and, consequently, take stands against acitivities that threaten the integrity of the users of this global library. Just the same way that we protect (or should be protecting) the users inside our physical libraries from outside control and supervision of their reading habits.

Reset the Library is a step-by-step teaching kit providing some tools and methods that you can use to boost online privacy in your own library community. First by boosting your own practical skills, then by boosting your library’s privacy, and then by boosting your library community’s online privacy. If you would like to give me a hand developing Resetthelibrary.org, don’t hesitate to contact me and I’ll invite you in as a collaborator!  Also, of course: feel free to share the make and, if you like, remix it to better suit your own community!

So, what are you waiting for? Go ahead now and Reset the Library! :)

/Åke
If you want to collaborate on ResetTheLibrary.org, send an e-mail to mozillarian @ gmail . com and I’ll send you an invite!